PTA Reflections for the Arts

Reflections image
Reflections for the Arts

National PTA Reflections is America’s oldest and largest arts education program of its kind. The program was developed in 1969 by Colorado’s PTA President Mary Lou Anderson to encourage students to explore their talents and express themselves. Since then, the Reflections Arts Program has inspired millions of students to reflect on a specific theme and create original artwork. Each year, students in Grades Pre-K through 12 are recognized for bringing the theme to life through Film Production, Dance Choreography, Literature, Music Composition, Photography, and Visual Arts. 

For Students:

The 2017-18 Reflections for the Arts program theme is Within Reach. Students reflect on this theme through dance, a short film, a poem or story, an original song, a photo or visual work of art. Pick up a PTA Reflections Entry Form today from the front office, and return it WITH YOUR ENTRY to the front office by Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. 

Entry forms can be printed from this link
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Reflections Official Rules Document

For Parents:

What is PTA Reflections for the Arts?

PTA Reflections welcomes students of all grades and all abilities to explore their inner artist. Students may explore one or all six arts disciplines, including: Dance Choreography, Film Production, Literature, Music Composition, Photography and Visual Arts.  Read more about Reflections for the Arts at the SC PTA website.

When do students complete their Reflections entry? 

Students can reflect on the annual theme in school or at home and are recognized for their participation and achievement in the arts.

 

Are there awards?

Every student is recognized for their accomplishments with the opportunity for state and national awards and recognition and through a recognition program that takes place at the Clemson Arts Center each Spring.

 

Who are the judges?

Artists, writers, videographers and creatives from all across the Upstate are invited to conduct blind judging of Reflections entries. Awards are given for first, second, third and honorable mention.  These entries then advance on to the next level of judging, which includes district, state, and finally national levels.

 

Why should my student participate?

The love of art and celebration of students can bring people together – families, teachers, and friends in the community.

 

Should I help my child with his or her Reflections entry?

Entries should represent students’ unique creativity. Adults are welcome to encourage students but are asked not to assist in any way with their interpretation of the theme or artistic expression.

 

Are there academic benefits to art in education?

New academic standards require more critical thinking and problem solving, which translates into more creativity and deeper reflection. That’s why Reflections isn’t just for arts classes.

 

How can I help?

Families can support their children’s participation by creating time and space for students to work on their entries, providing encouragement and needed materials and volunteering to support the Reflections program. Email Reflections chairperson Heidi Coryell Williams at heidicwilliams@gmail.com for more information or to volunteer your time and talents to this program.

 

2016-17 winners

Primary Visual Art
1st Place: Madeleine Lee-Sosolik “My Family” 
2nd Place: Sienna Pegues “My Story/Hands”
3rd Place: Banks Craddock “Trooper”
Honorable Mention: Cannon Yoder “Football: My Life, My Dream”

Intermediate Visual Art
1st Place: Sarah Grace Partridge “My Selfies”
2nd Place: Anya Moysey “Tracing Your Roots”
3rd Place: Riya Zutshi “Challenge"

Intermediate Film Production
1st Place: Sarah Bradley Wells “How to Make a Movie”

Primary Literature
1st Place: Sylvia Linville “My Favorite Sports”

Intermediate Literature
1st Place: Jane Laurence “The Tree”
2nd Place:  Ashby Williams “The Revenge”

Primary Photography
1st Place: Bridget Everson “A Nice Day”

Primary Music
1st Place: Corina Everson “Once Upon a Time"

 
Placing at State for the third year in a row:
FILM PRODUCTION - Intermediate Artist 
Sarah Bradley Wells 
How to Make a Movie 
Won the Merit Award